Supporting Digital Scholarship in Research Libraries: Scalability and Sustainability

Monica McCormick and I just published an article entitled “Supporting Digital Scholarship in Research Libraries: Scalability and Sustainability” in the Journal of Library Administration special issue “Digital Humanities in Libraries: New Models for Scholarly Engagement,” edited by Barbara Rockenbach (Columbia University). In this issue the authors explore how libraries can support and participate in digital humanities initiatives, and some of the challenges of doing so.

Author Micah Vandegrift (Florida State University) negotiated with the publisher, Taylor & Francis, to add an addendum to the author’s agreement limiting T&F’s exclusive license to publish and retaining copyright and additional publishing rights for the authors. This is the agreement that we all signed. Read his description of the negotiation process, and more on the negotiation. In these posts Micah provides a nice model for other authors who want to do the same.

And for those without access to Taylor & Francis journals, or who just prefer to read open access versions of things, Micah also kindly created an alt/OA Table of Contents with links to the open access versions of our articles.

Our article:

Vinopal, Jennifer, and Monica McCormick. “Supporting Digital Scholarship in Research Libraries: Scalability and Sustainability.” Journal of Library Administration 53, no. 1 (January 1, 2013): 27–42. doi:10.1080/01930826.2013.756689.

Abstract:

New York University Libraries and our partners in Information Technology Services offer effective enterprise-wide technology solutions for many academic practices, but we are still working to solve the “faculty Web site problem”—providing services for digital scholarship and publishing in a way that is both scalable and sustainable. This article describes our study of NYU scholars’ needs and digital scholarship support at other research institutions, and then introduces a service model we developed for supporting such services (which may include digitization, hosting of research data, digital publishing, the development of software for scholarly practices, and more). We then discuss the challenges to research libraries of implementing our service model in a scalable, sustainable way, by addressing project and tool selection, staffing, and organizational change.